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Knowing when but not how!: mothers' perceptions and use of antibiotics in a rural area of Viet Nam
Medical Students linked to ICH and IHCAR (Karolinska Instituet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0122-7234
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2000 (English)In: Tropical doctor, ISSN 0049-4755, E-ISSN 1758-1133, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 6-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Given the world-wide focus on how to rationally use antibiotics, national drug policy programmes have been developed in many countries in order to minimize the environmental antibiotic pressure and thereby hopefully limit increasing bacterial resistance. This study investigated perceptions of antibiotics in a health system with weak drug regulation. The study was conducted in two rural communes in Viet Nam, with a drug market characterized by the increased accessibility and consumption of pharmaceuticals. The study focused on rural mothers' perceptions and use of antibiotics in the treatment of acute respiratory infections (ARI) in children 5 years and under. A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods were used including key informant interviews, focus group discussions, and interviews with mothers and drug vendors. The study demonstrated that using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods gives a better understanding of the prevailing perceptions and use of antibiotics in communities. The results showed that the mothers recognized well the signs of severe ARI and that antibiotics were reserved for more severe illness episodes, where penicillin V and ampicillin were first drugs of choice. However, the mothers' perceptions and use of antibiotics reflects indigenization of antibiotics into traditional Vietnamese thinking and medical practice. This resulted in self-medication and a respect for antibiotics from the mothers' point of view. A first step towards the rational use of antibiotics is already taken where mothers, as the health decision-maker, know when to initiate antibiotic treatment and try to limit unnecessary use of antibiotics. The next step is to develop a well-functioning health education programme in order to promote the correct use of antibiotics for a successful clinical outcome. This requires acknowledgement of the mothers' culture based behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 30, no 1, p. 6-10
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27378DOI: 10.1177/004947550003000105PubMedID: 10842510OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-27378DiVA, id: diva2:603593
Available from: 2013-02-06 Created: 2013-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Halfvarson, Jonas

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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