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Dietary cadmium exposure and prostate cancer incidence: a population-based prospective cohort study
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, The Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, The Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
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2012 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 895-900Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Experimental data convincingly propose the toxic metal cadmium as a prostate carcinogen. Cadmium is widely dispersed into the environment and, consequently, food is contaminated.

Methods: A population-based cohort of 41 089 Swedish men aged 45-79 years was followed prospectively from 1998 through 2009 to assess the association between food frequency questionnaire-based estimates of dietary cadmium exposure (at baseline, 1998) and incidence of prostate cancer (3085 cases, of which 894 were localised and 794 advanced) and through 2008 for prostate cancer mortality (326 fatal cases).

Results: Mean dietary cadmium exposure was 19 μg per day±s.d. 3.7. Multivariable-adjusted dietary cadmium exposure was positively associated with overall prostate cancer, comparing extreme tertiles; rate ratio (RR) 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.24). For subtypes of prostate cancer, the RR was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.08-1.53) for localised, 1.05 (95% CI: 0.87-1.25) for advanced, and 1.14 (95% CI: 0.86-1.51) for fatal cases. No statistically significant difference was observed in the multivariable-adjusted risk estimates between tumour subtypes (P(heterogeneity)=0.27). For localised prostate cancer, RR was 1.55 (1.16-2.08) among men with a small waist circumference and RR 1.45 (1.15, 1.83) among ever smokers.

Conclusion: Our findings provide support that dietary cadmium exposure may have a role in prostate cancer development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, United Kingdom: Nature Publishing Group, 2012. Vol. 21, no 5, p. 895-900
Keywords [en]
Dietary cadmium, epidemiology, prospective cohort, prostate cancer, subtypes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-27453DOI: 10.1038/bjc.2012.311ISI: 000307771100019PubMedID: 22850555Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84927583345OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-27453DiVA, id: diva2:603760
Available from: 2013-02-06 Created: 2013-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, Jan-ErikAndersson, Swen-OlofAndrén, Ove

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