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Heavy metal and hip-hop style preferences and externalizing problem behavior: a two-wave longitudinal study
Research Centre Adolescent Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands. (Center for Developmental research)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0185-8805
Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
2008 (English)In: Youth & society, ISSN 0044-118X, E-ISSN 1552-8499, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 435-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 39, no 4, p. 435-452
Keywords [en]
heavy metal; hip-hop; youth culture style preferences; externalizing problem behavior; adolescents
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28553DOI: 10.1177/0044118X07308069OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-28553DiVA, id: diva2:614218
Note

This study examines (a) the stability of Dutch adolescents' preferences for heavy metal and hip-hop youth culture styles, (b) longitudinal associations between their preferences and externalizing problem behavior, and (c) the moderating role of gender in these associations. Questionnaire data were gathered from 931 adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 years in two waves with a 2-year interval. Results suggest that preferences for heavy metal and hip-hop youth culture styles are moderately stable over a 2-year period. Preference for the hip-hop style was found to predict later externalizing problems in both boys and girls. Preference for the heavy metal style predicted later externalizing problems exclusively in boys. Adolescents' externalizing problems did not predict later preferences for hip-hop or heavy metal.

Available from: 2013-04-03 Created: 2013-04-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Selfhout, Maarten

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