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Consequence of Sun Exposure on the Level of Urinary Thymine Dimer and the Modulating Effect of Sunscreen
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
2013 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) absorbed by the human skin cells can cause DNA lesions and formation of those is linked to development of skin cancer. Cylobutane thymine dimer (T=T) is one of the predominant lesions which is excreted in the urine after repair in skin cells. Urinary T=T can be used as a biomarker of exposure to UVR. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of UVR on urinary T=T levels in individuals before and after one week at the island Tenerife and to compare the protective effect of sunscreen in two groups, i.e. group (A) of 12 persons who had to use sunscreen as instructed and group (B) of 11 persons who were not instructed to use sunscreen. Furthermore, the association between T=T levels and other parameters such as standard erythemal dose, pigment protection factor, time spent outdoors and serum vitamin D level was investigated. Urinary T=T was analysed with the 32P-postlabelling assay. T=T could not be detected in samples collected before going to Tenerife, but after returning from the island the levels were increased in a rage of 27 to 804 fmol/μmol creatinine (mean 140 and 180 fmol/μmol creatinine for group A and B, respectively). There was no significant difference in T=T levels between the two study groups (p = 0.82). The hypothesis was that T=T levels for group B would be higher than for group A and the reason for not finding that is unknown but could simply be due to the low number of participants. No significant correlations were observed between T=T level and other  parameters, except for T=T with time spent outdoors, with a negative correlation which can not be explained. In conclusion, UVR exposure induces DNA damage in exposed humans that is measurable as increased T=T levels in urine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28605ISRN: ORU-NAT/BIO-AG-2013/0002--SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-28605DiVA: diva2:614961
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Available from: 2015-08-07 Created: 2013-04-08 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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