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Physical activity in treatment units for eating disorders: Clinical practice and attitudes
Modum Bad Psychiat Ctr, Res Inst, Vikersund, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sports Sci, Dept Sports Med, Oslo, Norway.
Univ Tromso, Dept Psychol, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
Modum Bad Psychiat Ctr, Res Inst, Vikersund, Norway.
Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
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2009 (English)In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 14, no 2-3, p. E106-E112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Physical activity (PA) in eating disorders (ED) may be harmful, but in a therapeutic setting also beneficial. The purpose of this survey was to examine these contradictory aspects of PA in ED specialist treatment settings. We examined whether 1) PA is assessed by the unit, 2) the units have guidelines for managing excessive PA, 3) the units have staff with higher education and special competence in PA and exercise science, 4) how units regard PA in ED, 5) whether regular PA is integrated in the treatment programs, and 6) how the units rate the role of PA in the treatment of ED compared with other mental disorders. METHODS: Of the 49 units located in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, 41 (84%) responded to a questionnaire. RESULTS: In 28 units (68%) PA was assessed regularly. Excessive PA was considered a harmful symptom in ED, and most units reported guidelines to manage excessive PA. Thirty-two units included PA in their treatment programmes. Clinicians found PA most relevant in the treatment of obesity and, except for binge eating, less for ED. CONCLUSION: PA was more commonly integrated in treatment compared to previous studies. Future research should address how to manage excessive PA, and the potential beneficial role of PA in the treatment of ED. (Eating Weight Disord. 14: e106-e112, 2009). (C) 2009, Editrice Kurtis

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 14, no 2-3, p. E106-E112
Keywords [en]
Eating disorders, physical activity, exercise, treatment, clinical practice
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28118ISI: 000272207600011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-28118DiVA, id: diva2:639501
Available from: 2013-08-08 Created: 2013-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Norring, Claes

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