oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Communicating and hand(ling) technologies: everyday life in educational settings where pupils with cochlear implants are mainstreamed
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (CCD Research group)
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (CCD Research group)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1846-858X
Department of Child and Youth Studies, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm Sweden.
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Different technologies are commonly used in mainstream classrooms to teach pupils who wear surgically implanted cochlear hearing aids. We focus on these technologies, their application, how pupils react to them, and how they affect mainstream classrooms in Sweden. Our findings indicate that language ideologies play out in specific ways in such technified environments. The hegemonic position wielded by adults with regard to the use of technology usage has specific implications for pupils with cochlear implants.

Keywords [en]
cochlear implants, language ideology, oral communication, visually-oriented communication, mainstream schools
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-31005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-31005DiVA, id: diva2:651935
Available from: 2013-09-27 Created: 2013-09-27 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Learning by hearing?: Technological framings for participation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning by hearing?: Technological framings for participation
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis examines technological framings for communication and identity issues, with a particular focus on Swedish mainstream schools where children with cochlear implants are pupils. Based on a sociocultural perspective on learning, the thesis focuses on how pupils and teachers interact with (and thus learn from) each other in classroom settings. The study comprises a) a sociohistorical analysis of three Swedish non-governmental organizations’ periodicals from 1891 to 2010, and b) an ethnographic study including micro-analyses of interaction in two mainstream classrooms where there are children with cochlear implants. The sociohistorical analysis illustrates how different technologies, in a range of ways, have shaped (i) how people with hearing loss communicate and interact with others and (ii) their identity positions. The analysis also demonstrates the presence of language ideologies in settings where children with hearing loss are taught. Here the main preference is for spoken communication, even though different types of visual communication emerge during the 1980s and 1990s. In addition, the issue of integration has been a matter of debate since the 1970s and provides a backdrop for the current situation, where an increasing number of children with cochlear implants receive their schooling in mainstream public rather than segregated regional deaf schools.

Against this background, micro-analyses have been carried out of classroom interaction and recurring patterns and activities have been identified. The results illustrate that audiologically-oriented and communicative-link technologies play major roles in the classrooms and these both facilitate and limit the pupils’ participation. Based on postcolonial theory, the results can be understood in terms of participation and non-participation of the pupil with cochlear implants, who acquire peripheral identity positions in these classroom settings. The analysis also illuminates unequal power relations regarding technologies in use, and expressions of language ideologies in the classrooms, where spoken communication is preferred. Overall, the everyday life of children with cochlear implants in mainstream schools appears to be complex, and it is technologies in use that frame the conditions for their participation in interaction and communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro universitet, 2013. p. 124
Series
Örebro Studies in Education, ISSN 1404-9570 ; 42
Keywords
Cochlear implants, deaf, mainstream, participation, communication forms, communities of practice, ethnography, sociocultural, postcolonial, language ideology
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-30754 (URN)978-91-7668-962-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-10-21, Hörsal Bio, Forumhuset, Örebro universitet, Fakultetsgatan 1, 701 82 Örebro, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-09-09 Created: 2013-09-09 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Holmström, IngelaBagga-Gupta, Sangeeta

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Holmström, IngelaBagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
By organisation
School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences
Educational Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 206 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf