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Contrasting between high-performers’ andlow-performers’ justice perceptions of effort and turnover cognitions: Can you rely on high-performers’ during plant closures?
Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. (CEROC)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9580-421X
Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Managers planning for a prolonged plantclosure would probably contemplate stang, and per-haps one way to try to ensure continued productivitywould be putting high-performing employees in key po-sitions in the hope that they would continue perform-ing throughout the closure. Such stang cues havebeen proposed to be used during downsizing (Appel-baum, et al., 1987). However, a senior top managerwho has initiated and led 16 plant closures throughouthis career and responsible for this specic plant clo-sure, reported that he has tested this stang approachduring plant closures with unsatisfying results - insteadhigh-performing employees had a tendency to stop per-forming and having higher tendency to quit. The pur-pose of this paper is to investigate the anecdotal re-ports that high-performing employees stop performingand have a higher tendency to quit during plant clo-sures. A longitudinal design was used, with one yearbetween data collection points (T1 and T2). Data wascollected using online and paper copies of the samequestionnaire, with a response rate of 61% on T1 and55% on T2. A 2 (T1 Job performance: Low vs. High)2 (T2 Overall justice: Low vs. High) between-subjectanalysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed on two dependent variables (eort and turnover cogni-tions), while controlling for positive and negative aec-tivity. The results showed that high-performers' whoperceived low justice received lowest scores on eort,while low-performers' perceiving low justice receivednext highest score on eort. Whereas, all groups whoperceived high justice had lower turnover cognitionsthan those who perceived low justice. This study lendsupport to the top senior managers report that usinghigh-performers' in key positions during a plant clo-sure could be disappointment since the results suggestthat high-performers' could either be those who putforth most and least eort, depending on if they per-ceive low justice. Therefore, we suggest that it couldbe more productive to open up the key positions to allemployees to apply and interview those who are inter-ested - the interviews should aim at investigating if thespecic role would have some form of instrumentalityfor the employee.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-31998OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-31998DiVA, id: diva2:655886
Conference
15th Conference of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Maastricht, May 25 - May 28, 2011
Available from: 2013-10-14 Created: 2013-10-14 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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