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Organic amendments affect delta C-13 signature of soil respiration and soil organic C accumulation in a long-term field experiment in Sweden
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4384-5014
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Soil Science, ISSN 1351-0754, E-ISSN 1365-2389, Vol. 64, no 5, p. 621-628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The contribution of young and old soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to soil CO2 fluxes and specific respiration rates of these fluxes was determined by using C-13 signatures in the Ultuna long-term continuous soil organic matter experiment (C-SOME). Initiated in 1956, the experiment had a range of treatments amended organically and with mineral nitrogen fertilizer under C-3 cultivation until 1999, and thereafter under C-4 (maize) cultivation. In 2011, soil respiration was measured in situ prior to planting, during growth and after harvest. The contributions from C-4- and C-3-C as well as their specific respiration rates were estimated from C-13 differences in SOC and CO2 fluxes. The contributions from C-4-C sources were further separated into autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration by comparing respiration rates before and after harvest. Between 165 and 385g C-4-Cm-2 accumulated during 10years of maize growth, contributing between 4.9 and 8.1% to the total SOC stock. Although recent C-4-C had an average specific respiration rate that was 8.4-22.6 times greater than C-3-C, total soil respiration was generally equally split between C-3-C and C-4-C. Both pools are therefore important sources of CO2 in the overall C budget, and a crucial factor in accounting for SOC stock change caused by management. Experimental treatments influenced specific respiration rates of C-4 plant material and accumulation of SOC stock, demonstrating how greater SOC accumulation can be favoured by high-quality C inputs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 64, no 5, p. 621-628
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32401DOI: 10.1111/ejss.12077ISI: 000325143700009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-32401DiVA, id: diva2:664457
Note

Funding Agency: Faculty of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences at SLU

Available from: 2013-11-15 Created: 2013-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Ekblad, Alf

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