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Nonverbal communication as argumentation
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
Bergens Universitet, Bergen, Norway; Södertörns högskola, Stockholm, Sweden.
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation / [ed] F.H. van Eemeren et al, Amsterdam: Rozenberg Publishers, 2011, p. 567-576Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Nonverbal behaviour as argumentation in election campaign interviews

Do politicians argue with their bodies? Normally argumentation is described as: 1) characterized by temporal and sequential representations, 2) based on unambiguous syntactic rules, 3) historically and methodologically linked to the verbal mode of expression and its conventional, semiotic character, 4) being about attitudes and opinions proposed through claim and datum, and hence, is confrontational in nature. It thus appears impossible for a person’s rhetorical actio to make arguments. The body – it seems – cannot create the verbal, explicit two-part structure of an argument.

                      However, arguments are not found in statements, but in people. It is a perspective we take (Brockreide 1992). As long as a message works as a stimulus evoking the receiver’s cognitively generated argument (cf. Hample 1980, 1992, Gronbeck 1995) the message has been used as argumentation.

                      This means that also non-verbal behaviour may function as argumentation. Based on a rhetorical, cognitive and contextual view of argumentation (cf. Kjeldsen 2007) and the theory of actio capital (e.g. nonverbal resources of rhetoric, Gelang 2008) this paper will examine the argumentative dimensions of the non-verbal behaviour of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton in their contest for the 2008 American Democratic presidential nomination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Rozenberg Publishers, 2011. p. 567-576
Keywords [en]
Nonverbal comunication, argumentation, rhetoric
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
Rhetoric
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32881ISBN: 9789036102438 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-32881DiVA, id: diva2:682521
Conference
7th International Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation, Amsterdam,June 29 to July 2, 2010
Available from: 2013-12-27 Created: 2013-12-27 Last updated: 2018-05-05Bibliographically approved

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Gelang, Marie

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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