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Consumption of Fish Products across the Lifespan and Prostate Cancer Risk
University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA, United States of America.
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA, United States of America; Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, p. e59799-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine whether fish and fish oil consumption across the lifespan is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer.

Design: The study was nested among 2268 men aged 67-96 years in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort study. In 2002 to 2006, dietary habits were assessed, for early life, midlife and later life using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were followed for prostate cancer diagnosis and mortality through 2009 via linkage to nationwide cancer- and mortality registers. Adjusting for potential confounders, we used regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) for prostate cancer according to fish and fish oil consumption.

Results: Among the 2268 men, we ascertained 214 prevalent and 133 incident prostate cancer cases, of which 63 had advanced disease. High fish consumption in early- and midlife was not associated with overall or advanced prostate cancer. High intake of salted or smoked fish was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of advanced prostate cancer both in early life (95% CI: 1.08, 3.62) and in later life (95% CI: 1.04, 5.00). Men consuming fish oil in later life had a lower risk of advanced prostate cancer [HR (95% CI): 0.43 (0.19, 0.95)], no association was found for early life or midlife consumption.

Conclusions: Salted or smoked fish may increase risk of advanced prostate cancer, whereas fish oil consumption may be protective against progression of prostate cancer in elderly men. In a setting with very high fish consumption, no association was found between overall fish consumption in early or midlife and prostate cancer risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 4, p. e59799-
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33089DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059799ISI: 000317907200004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-33089DiVA, id: diva2:687458
Note

Funding Agency: Framfor (Progress); Nordic Health Whole Grain Food, NIH 5 T32 CA09001-36; American Institute for Cancer Research;  National Institute on Aging, N01-AG-1-2100; Intramural Research Program of the National Institute on Aging, the Icelandic Heart Association; Althingi (the Icelandic Parliament)

Available from: 2014-01-14 Created: 2014-01-14 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved

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Fall, KatjaAspelund, Thor

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