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Effects of workplace, family and cultural influences on low back pain: What opportunities exist to address social factors in general consultations?
Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; University of Massachusetts, School of Medicine, Worcester MA, USA.
Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom.
Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; University of Massachusetts, School of Medicine, Worcester MA, USA; Harvard Univ, School Public Health, Boston MA, USA.
Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom.
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2013 (English)In: Baillière's Best Practice & Research: Clinical Rheumatology, ISSN 1521-6942, E-ISSN 1532-1770, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 637-648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social factors are widely acknowledged in behavioural models of pain and pain management, but incorporating these factors into general medical consultations for low back pain (LBP) can be challenging. While there is no compelling evidence that social factors contribute to LBP onset, these factors have been shown to influence functional limitation and disability, especially the effects of organisational support in the workplace, spousal support, family conflict and social disadvantage. A number of barriers exist to address such social factors in routine medical encounters for LBP, but there is emerging evidence that improving social and organisational support may be an effective strategy to reduce the negative lifestyle consequences of LBP. For clinicians to address these factors in LBP treatment requires a clearer psychosocial framework in assessment and screening, more individualised problem-solving efforts, more patient-centred interventions involving family, peers and workplace supports and a less biomechanical and diagnostic approach. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 27, no 5, p. 637-648
Keywords [en]
Low back pain, Social factors, Organisational support, Social support, Back disability
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34281DOI: 10.1016/j.berh.2013.09.012ISI: 000330421100007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-34281DiVA, id: diva2:704867
Note

Funding Agency:

Scan/Design Foundation

Available from: 2014-03-13 Created: 2014-03-13 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved

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Linton, Steven J.

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