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Different attitudes when handling aggressive behaviour in dementia: narratives from two caregiver groups.
Centre for Nursing Science , Örebro University Hospital , Örebro, Sweden.
Centre for Nursing Science , Örebro University Hospital , Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2873-4247
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy and Elderly Care Research , Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden.
2003 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 277-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study highlights the experiences of 15 formal caregivers, during interactions with elderly residents suffering from dementia disease and showing aggressive behaviour. The purpose was to study caregivers' reflections about and attitudes to behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD) and how they dealt with the symptoms. This was done by comparing care units with high or low levels of aggressive behaviour in residents. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used for the analysis of the interviews. The main themes that emerged were: a need for balance between demands and competence; and a need for support. The findings indicated the importance of a balance for the residents as well as for the caregivers, if a positive relationship was to develop. Furthermore, caregivers stated that support was crucial, not only for the residents but also for themselves, if they were expected to cope with demanding situations. Different types of support were necessary and included: confirmation, feedback, and supervision. Residents who feel appreciated and respected may be less likely to act out their frustrations in an inappropriate manner. Caregivers who strive to understand the meaning behind a resident's behaviour and who master the necessary care-giving skills, and their implementation, could be more successful at curbing distressing behaviour, than caregivers who act merely in a custodial role.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 7, no 4, p. 277-286
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-35428DOI: 10.1080/1360786031000120679PubMedID: 12888439OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-35428DiVA, id: diva2:726635
Available from: 2014-06-18 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Skovdahl, KirstiKihlgren, Annica LarssonKihlgren, Mona

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