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Learning to Be Affected: Masculinities, Music and Social Embodiment
University of York. (Aestethics, Culture and Media)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9067-9496
2014 (English)In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 19, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Connell's concept of hegemonic masculinity remains a pervasive influence in critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM). However as Connell and Messerschmidt note, one of the key drawbacks of the approach is that it lacks an adequate theory of 'social embodiment'. Subsequent authors have explored how masculinities entail bodily control and regulation but this often reproduces the Cartesian divide between mind and body that CSMM is highly critical of. On the other hand, poststructuralist critiques often see the body as entirely constructed through discourse, undermining the problem of gendered, embodied experience. This article suggests that literature on affect is a means of moving between these two approaches in order to see masculinities as corporeally experienced through power relations, but ultimately not entirely reducible to them. Drawing on 6 life history case studies from a larger research project, the article demonstrates how 'learning to be affected' by music is an embodied process which relies fundamentally on learning physiological experience through social interaction. This highlights the potential for both re-producing and transforming gendered performances and offers a new theoretical framework for conceptualising masculinities in the field of CSMM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Guildford: Department of Sociology, University of Surrey , 2014. Vol. 19, no 2
Keyword [en]
Masculinities, Gender, Hegemonic Masculinity, Social Embodiment, Music, Affect
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-36258DOI: 10.5153/sro.3274ISI: 000344993200011Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84901816335OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-36258DiVA: diva2:742379
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2017-10-02Bibliographically approved

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de Boise, Sam

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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