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Risk of kidney cancer and chronic kidney disease in relation to hepatitis C virus infection: a nationwide register-based cohort study in Sweden
Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda MD, USA.
Dept Epidemiol, Swedish Inst Infect Dis Control, Solna, Sweden.
Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda MD, USA.
Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2011 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer Prevention, ISSN 0959-8278, E-ISSN 1473-5709, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 326-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an established cause of liver cancer, and recent studies have suggested a link with kidney cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk of kidney cancer in relation to HCV infection in a nationwide registry-based study of Swedish residents diagnosed with HCV between 1990 and 2006. A total of 43 000 individuals with chronic HCV infection were included, and the mean follow-up time was 9.3 years. Observed kidney cancer incidence and mortality in the cohort were compared with expected values based on the age-adjusted and sex-adjusted rates in the general population. Risk of hospitalization for other chronic kidney disease was also evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. No association between HCV infection and risk of kidney cancer was observed [standardized incidence ratio with 1-year lag=1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8-1.7]. Risk of hospitalization for noncancer kidney disease was significantly elevated in the HCV cohort, with significantly stronger associations observed among women than among men [hazard ratio=5.8 (95% CI: 4.2-7.9) and 3.9 (95% CI: 3.2-4.8) for women and men, respectively]. Results of this study do not support the hypothesis that chronic HCV infection confers an increased risk of kidney cancer. However, we did find an association between HCV infection and chronic kidney disease, particularly among women. Given inconsistent findings in the literature, it is premature to consider HCV infection to be a risk factor for kidney cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 20, no 4, p. 326-30
Keywords [en]
cancer registry, chronic hepatitis C virus infection, chronic kidney disease, kidney cancer, renal cell carcinoma
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37601DOI: 10.1097/CEJ.0b013e32834572faISI: 000291029600011PubMedID: 21386707Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79958782231OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-37601DiVA, id: diva2:753543
Note

Funding Agencies:

National Institutes of Health,National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics  Research Committee of Orebro County Council  2007/4077  OLL-91961 

Available from: 2014-10-08 Created: 2014-10-08 Last updated: 2018-05-05Bibliographically approved

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Duberg, Ann-Sofi

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