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Decrease in Breast Milk intake in Preterm Infants Discharged from Swedish Neonatal Units 2004-2013
Uppsala universitet, Högskolan Dalarna.
Högskolan Dalarna.
Uppsala universitet.
Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. (Stress och smärta i nyföddhetsperioden)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5996-2584
2014 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: Sweden is regarded as a very pro-breastfeeding culture with high rates of breastfeeding at discharge from hospital and during infancy. Among preterm infants in Sweden, the rates of breastfeeding at discharge from hospital were reported to be more than 90 % in the beginning of the 21 st century (Akerstrom 2007, Flacking 2003) However, lately there have been indications that breastfeeding incidence at discharge is decreasing among preterm infants cared for in Neonatal Units in Sweden. Thus, the objective was to describe breastfeeding incidence in preterm infants at discharge from neonatal units during the period 2004-2013.

Method: This study was a registry study with data collected from the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register (SNQ), a national registry of all infants cared for in almost all Neonatal Units in Sweden. This study included 29.445 preterm infants (<37 gestational weeks, gw) who were discharged to home and where information on breastfeeding was available.

Results: Preliminary findings indicated a decrease in exclusive breastfeeding from 57 % in 2004 to 30 % in 2013. The proportion of partially breastfed infants increased from 30 % in 2004 to 52 % in 2013. Although the proportion of partially breastfed infants increased, fewer infants were breastfed in 2013 (82 %) compared to 2004 (87 %). Among extremely preterm (<28 gw) infants (n=1936), the rate of any breastfeeding decreased from 56 % to 53 %; in very preterm (28-31 gw) infants (n=4595) from 81 % to 70 % and in moderately preterm (32-36 gw) infants (n=22.914) from 92 % to 87 %, during the study period. Gestational age at birth, multiple births, way of delivery and infants’ diseases did not seem to have increased during 2004-2013 and thereby influencing the decrease in breastfeeding. However, an increase in reported diseases in mothers was seen, from 15 % in 2004 to 29 % in 2013.

Conclusions: Our preliminary findings show a decrease in breastfeeding incidence at discharge among preterm infants in Sweden during 2004-2013. Further analyses may indicate potential influencing factors. Our preliminary findings give rise to concern and present a challenge to those working with preterm infants and their families in Neonatal Units in their support to mothers and their infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
Keyword [en]
Breast feeding, premature infant, newborn, neonatal intensive care
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Pediatrics; Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37659OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-37659DiVA: diva2:753916
Conference
17th ISRHML Conference, From Human Milk Molecules to Population Health: Research Advances, South Carolina, USA, October 23-27, 2014.
Projects
Proactive breastfeeding support to mothers of preterm infants
Available from: 2014-10-09 Created: 2014-10-09 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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