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Failure matters: unsuccessful cytogenetics and unperformed cytogenetics are associated with a poor prognosis in a population-based series of acute myeloid leukaemia
Department of Hematology and Coagulation, Skåne University Hospital, Lund; Stem Cell Center, Lund University, Lund.
Regional Cancer Center in South Sweden, Skåne University Hospital, Lund.
Department of Clinical Genetics, University and Regional Laboratories Region Skåne, Lund; Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Lund.
Department of Hematology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping.
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 94, no 5, 419-423 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unsuccessful cytogenetics (UC) in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) treated on different SWOG trials was recently reported to be associated with increased age and dismal outcome. To ascertain whether this holds true also in unselected patients with AML, we retrieved all cytogenetic reports in cases from the population-based Swedish AML Registry. Between 1997 and 2006, 1737 patients below 80 yr of age without myelosarcoma or acute promyelocytic leukaemia received intensive treatment. The frequencies of UC and unperformed cytogenetics (UPC) were 2.1% and 20%, respectively. The early death rates differed between the cytogenetic subgroups (P = 0.006) with the highest rates in patients with UC (14%) and UPC (12%) followed by high-risk (HR) AML, intermediate risk (IR) and standard risk (SR) cases successfully karyotyped (8.6%, 5.9%, and 5.8%, respectively). The complete remission rate was lower in UC and UPC and HR compared with the other risk groups (P < 0.001). The overall five-year survival rates were 25% for UC and 22% for UPC, whereas the corresponding frequencies for SR, IR and HR AML patients without UC and UPC were 64%, 31% and 15%, respectively. In conclusion, lack of cytogenetic data translates into a poor prognosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015. Vol. 94, no 5, 419-423 p.
Keyword [en]
unsuccessful metaphase analysis; Unperformed cytogenetics, acute myeloid leukaemia, karyotype, survival
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Hematology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37791DOI: 10.1111/ejh.12446ISI: 000352633000007PubMedID: 25200361Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84926476133OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-37791DiVA: diva2:755956
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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