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Conditioning sulfidic mine waste for growth of Agrostis capillaris - impact on solution chemistry
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7845-6495
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre)
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre)
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2104-4593
2014 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 21, no 11, 6888-6904 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contamination of the environment due to mining and mineral processing is an urgent problem worldwide. It is often desirable to establish a grass cover on old mine waste since it significantly decreases the production of leachates. To obtain sustainable growth, it is often necessary to improve several properties of the waste such as water-holding capacity, nutrient status, and toxicity. This can be done by addition of organic materials such as wood residues, e. g., compost. In this study, we focus on the solution chemistry of the leachates when a substrate containing historic sulfidic mine waste mixed with 30 % (volume) bark compost is overgrown by Agrostis capillaris. The pot experiments also included other growth-promoting additives (alkaline material, mycorrhiza, and metabolizable carbon) to examine whether a more sustainable growth could be obtained. Significant changes in the plant growth and in the leachates composition were observed during 8 weeks of growth. It was concluded that in this time span, the growth of A. capillaris did not affect the composition of the leachates from the pots. Instead, the composition of the leachates was determined by interactions between the bark compost and the mine waste. Best growth of A. capillaris was obtained when alkaline material and mycorrhiza or metabolizable carbon was added to the substrate.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014. Vol. 21, no 11, 6888-6904 p.
Keyword [en]
Agrostis capillaris, Mine waste, Bark compost, Leachate composition
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-37809DOI: 10.1007/s11356-014-2600-xISI: 000336371000012Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84901248901OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-37809DiVA: diva2:756416
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 226870
Available from: 2014-10-17 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Utilization of waste materials for extraction of strategic metals: a biogeochemical approach
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilization of waste materials for extraction of strategic metals: a biogeochemical approach
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Worldwide the modern society produces vast amounts of waste materials containing strategic and valuable metals. Some of them are of substantial economic or environmental significance if controlled recovery of metals can be performed or if uncontrolled release to the environment occurs.

By cultivating Agrostis capillaris on historical sulfidic mine waste the leachate composition can be altered and its volume reduced. In combination with additives such as bark compost and water works granules the concentration of several hazardous metals decreased significantly already after eight weeks. Limited actions can therefore be used to decrease the environmental impact from such waste.

Shale in general contains considerable amounts of strategic metals. If naturally occurring microorganisms are provided with a source of nutrients, increased mobilization of strategic metals can be obtained. By using wood chips as the nutrient source the mobilization of vanadium and uranium increased significantly. Highest mobilization efficiency was observed when the carbon source was put on top of the shale.

Analysis of strategic metals is often performed by argon plasma techniques such as ICP-QMS. However, the use of argon increases the analytical costs. If isotopic information is not needed and slightly higher uncertainties can be accepted, several strategic metals can successfully be quantified by the nitrogen plasma based MP AES. The analytical cost can then be cut with more than 99%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2017. 79 p.
Series
Örebro Studies in Environmental Science, ISSN 1650-6278 ; 17
Keyword
biogeochemistry, ICP-QMS, MP AES, strategic metals, vanadium, uranium, mine waste, steel slag, shale residues
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53960 (URN)978-91-7529-174-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-02-17, Örebro universitet, Hörsalen, Musikhögskolan, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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