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Cultural and social perspectives on attitudes, noise and risk behaviour in children and young adults
Division of Psychology and Organizational Studies, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University West, Trollhättan.
Department of Communicative Disorders, College of Public Health & Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Division of Psychology and Organizational Studies, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University West, Trollhättan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9184-6989
Division of Psychology and Organizational Studies, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University West, Trollhättan .
2008 (English)In: Seminars in Hearing, ISSN 0734-0451, Vol. 29, no 1, 29-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interdisciplinary research is critical to the prevention of hearing loss in children and young adults. To meet that goal, this paper focuses on the relationship between the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss, attitudes to noise and exposure, and how hearing protection use seems to be linked to cultural and socioeconomic factors. Results of a series of studies point to attitudes as one explanatory factor. Additionally, the experience of hearing symptoms such as tinnitus and noise sensitivity increases the likelihood that adolescents and young adults will choose to wear earplugs when attending clubs or discotheques. This behavior can be referred to as an important ‘‘trigger’’ mechanism for the development of health-related behavior. Some general theories on health behavior are discussed to understand the role attitudes play for hearing prevention in young people. Finally, the finding that adolescents seeking professional help for tinnitus appear to have strong fears related to anxious thoughts and reactions associated with the condition is addressed. These fears can be a sign of a phobic reaction, something that most often first appears during adolescence. For these reasons, interdisciplinary research in the investigation of tinnitus distress and hearing conservation in young people seems to be the most relevant approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: Thieme Medical Publishers, 2008. Vol. 29, no 1, 29-41 p.
Keyword [en]
Attitudes, noise exposure, adolescence, hearingrelated symptoms, socioeconomic status
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38772DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1021770ISI: PREV200800676207Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-39449133416OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-38772DiVA: diva2:764534
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2015-03-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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Output format
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