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Perceived hearing status and attitudes towards noise in young adults
University of Florida, Gainesville, USA.
University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9184-6989
University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, USA.
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2007 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 16, no 2, S182-S189 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of perceived hearing loss, tinnitus, and temporary threshold shift (TTS) in community college students and to see whether those students’ attitudes toward noise affected their perception of their own possible hearing loss, tinnitus, and TTS.

Method: Young adults (N = 245; age 18–27) completed 3 questionnaires: the Hearing Symptom Description, Youth Attitude to Noise Scale, and Adolescents’ Habits and Hearing Protection Use.

Results: Perceived TTS and pain associated with loud noise were the most common hearing related factors, followed by perceived tinnitus and hearing loss. The students’ attitudes toward noise in their daily environment showed the most negative response, whereas attitudes toward noise and concentration indicated a more positive, or less harmful, response. Chi-square analysis indicated a significant correlation between perceived hearing loss and respondents’ overall attitudes toward noise exposure. Hearing protection use was limited for all participants, with the majority reporting never having used hearing protection.

Conclusion: Approximately 6% of respondents reported perceived hearing loss, and 13.5% reported prolonged tinnitus. In general, participants had neutral attitudes toward noise. Over 20% of participants reported ear pain, tinnitus, and/or TTS after noise exposure at least sometimes. Coincidentally, few participants reported consistent use of hearing protection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Rockville, USA: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2007. Vol. 16, no 2, S182-S189 p.
Keyword [en]
Noise, hearing protection, tinnitus, attitudes toward noise
National Category
Social Sciences Medical and Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38773DOI: 10.1044/1059-0889(2007/022)PubMedID: 18056871OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-38773DiVA: diva2:764536
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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