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Legitimacy through Partnership?: EU Policy Diffusion in Britain and Sweden
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. (Democratic Government in Change)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3602-1837
Department of Politics, University of Sheffield, Elmfield Northumberland Road, Sheffield S10 2YU, UK.
2001 (English)In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 24, no 3, 215-237 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Partnership has become a central principle of European Union (EU) policies, particularly in relation to the structural funds. This article considers the diffusion of the partnership principle in the EU, focusing on Britain and Sweden. It is concerned with two questions. First, has the partnership principle led to a process of harmonisation across states or to national resistance? Second, to what extent has the partnership principle enhanced the legitimacy of EU decision making?. The evidence presented here suggests that though there has not been significant resistance to the partnership principle within Britain and Sweden, the EU's requirements have been interpreted and implemented differently in the two states. Thus it is more appropriate to speak of *adaptation' to partnership rather than 'adoption'. This is explained by what we summarise as 'national democratic traditions'. In terms of democratic legitimacy, the Swedish adaptation to partnership was nominally more democratic in that local politicians were readily involved from the outset, whereas in Britain they were not. However, the importance of this inclusion should not be overstated in relation to substantive democratic legitimacy. The Swedish model was not supported by well-articulated democratic strategies or principles. Despite the limitations of the Swedish model, recent developments suggest that Britain is following a similar path.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 24, no 3, 215-237 p.
Keyword [en]
European Union (EU) policies, legitimacy, decision making, harmonisation
National Category
Social Sciences Law and Society
Research subject
Political Science; Law
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38780DOI: 10.1111/1467-9477.00054ISI: 000170979700003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0035600929OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-38780DiVA: diva2:764593
Available from: 2014-11-19 Created: 2014-11-19 Last updated: 2015-02-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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