oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Levels and distributions of hexachlorobutadiene and three chlorobenzenes in biosolids from wastewater treatment plants and in soils within and surrounding a chemical plant in China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 1525-1531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) was recently proposed as a candidate persistent organic pollutant (POP) under the Stockholm Convention, information about its environmental levels and distributions is still very limited. In this work, HCBD was determined in the sewage sludge from 37 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in 23 cities and 17 soils near a chemical plant in China. Three chlorobenzenes (CBs) (1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene) were simultaneously studied to help better understand the environmental behavior of HCBD. Concentrations of HCBD in sludge samples ranged from <0.03 to 74.3 ng/g dry weight (dw) with a median value of 0.30 ng/g dw, which was lower than those of the three CBs. Levels of HCBD were not correlated with capacity of the WWTPs and total organic carbon. For soils, high level of HCBD was found in the sample within the plant, with a rapid decreasing concentration trend with the increase of distance from the plant. It was suspected that releasing as a byproduct during manufacturing of chlorinated chemicals was the primary source of HCBD in the studied location. Further risk assessment indicated that the environmental risk of HCBD to soil organisms and the health risk to employees were very low through soil exposure within the plant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 48, no 3, p. 1525-1531
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38402DOI: 10.1021/es405171tISI: 000331015100023PubMedID: 24401031Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84893595313OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-38402DiVA, id: diva2:765032
Note

Sponsors:

National Basic Research Program of China  Grant no: 2014CB441105 

National Natural Science Foundation of China  Grant no:s 21337002  21222702  21177147 

Available from: 2014-11-21 Created: 2014-11-07 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Wang, Thanh

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wang, Thanh
In the same journal
Environmental Science and Technology
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 430 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf