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Changes in catastrophizing and depressed mood during and after early cognitive behaviorally oriented interventions for pain
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2718-7402
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9429-9012
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5359-0452
2014 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 332-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Catastrophizing and depressed mood are risk factors for poor outcome in treatments for pain and appear to act as mediators for favorable outcome. However, little is known about how catastrophizing and depressed mood co-occur within individuals and how these patterns change during treatment, which is the focus of the current study. The study uses data from a randomized controlled trial about early cognitive behaviorally oriented interventions for patients with nonspecific spinal pain (N = 84). Cluster analyses were used to extract subgroups of individuals with similar scoring patterns on catastrophizing and depressed mood at pretreatment, mid-treatment, posttreatment, and at 6 months' follow-up. To track individual progress, the clusters were linked over time. The analyses revealed four clusters: "low depression and catastrophizing", "high depression and catastrophizing", "high depression", and "high catastrophizing". There was little individual transition from one scoring pattern to another across time, not at least for those scoring high on both depressed mood and catastrophizing. Moreover, high stability within this cluster was related to low levels of psychological flexibility at baseline. It is concluded that catastrophizing and depressed mood at the start of treatment were likely to remain high despite a cognitive behavioral intervention and that a lack of psychological flexibility may have a role.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 43, no 4, p. 332-341
Keywords [en]
catastrophizing; depression; CBT; cluster analyses
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39617DOI: 10.1080/16506073.2014.940605ISI: 000344862500006PubMedID: 25268910Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84911004799OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-39617DiVA, id: diva2:771105
Available from: 2014-12-12 Created: 2014-12-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Flink, Ida K.Boersma, KatjaLinton, Steven J.

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