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Can democratic innovations generate trust?: an e-­petitioning case study
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Center for Democratic Government in Change)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7291-2875
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Center for Democratic Government in Change)
Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. (Center for Democratic Government in Change)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5485-8577
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Declining trust in representative institutions is considered to be one of the most significant political problems of our time. It is often assumed that democratic innovations or mechanisms that aim to increase and deepen citizen participation in the political decision-making process - can help reversing this trend. However, skeptics claim that any impact on perceived trust is dubious at best. With survey data representing 1,470 e-petitioning participants in Swedish local government, this study aims to empirically assess the relationship between democratic innovations and trust. First we ask whether e-petitioning primarily engage dissatisfied or already satisfied democrats. This is interesting considering that conventional participation usually is biased towards satisfied democrats, while unconventional participation usually is biased towards dissatisfied democrats. How about democratic innovations? Second we ask to what extent the participants´ perceived trust in local government is affected by their participation. Results show that e-petitioning successfully engages both satisfied and dissatisfied democrats, as well as that political participation affects their trust in local government. However, changes in perceived trust vary according to participants’ predisposition toward government.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39880OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-39880DiVA, id: diva2:773116
Conference
8th ECPR General Conference, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK, September 3-6, 2014
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Åström, JoachimJonsson, MagnusKarlsson, Martin

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf