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Oral Motor Dysfunction in Children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy: effects of Surgery
Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping.
Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping.
Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping.
Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping; Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping. (Child)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8549-9039
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2009 (English)In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 111-116Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is associated with a wide range of problems. The enlargement causes obstructive symptoms and affects different functions such as chewing, swallowing, articulation, and voice. The objective of this study was to assess oral motor function in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy using Nordic Orofacial Test-Screening (NOT-S) before and 6 months after surgery consisting of adenoidectomy combined with total or partial tonsil removal. A total of 67 children were assigned to either tonsillectomy (n33) or partial tonsillectomy, ‘tonsillotomy’ (n34); 76 controls were assessed with NOT-S and divided into a younger and older age group to match pre- and post-operated children. Most children in the study groups had oral motor problems prior to surgery including snoring, open mouth position, drooling, masticatory, and swallowing problems. Post-surgery oral motor function was equal to controls. Improvement was independent of surgery method.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, USA: Informa Healthcare, 2009. Vol. 34, no 3, p. 111-116
Keywords [en]
Adenotonsillar hypertrophy, children, NOT-S, oral motor function, tonsil surgery
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-40783DOI: 10.1080/14015430903066937ISI: 000270053100003PubMedID: 19565403Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-70349670957OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-40783DiVA, id: diva2:778650
Available from: 2015-01-11 Created: 2015-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Ericsson, Elisabeth

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