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Heritability and longitudinal stability of schizotypal traits during adolescence
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
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2011 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 499-511Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study investigated the genetic and environmental etiology of schizotypal personality traits in a non-selected sample of adolescent twins, measured on two occasions between the ages of 11 and 16 years old. The 22-item Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire- Child version (SPQ-C) was found to be factorially similar to the adult version of this instrument, with three underlying factors (Cognitive-Perceptual, Interpersonal-Affective, and Disorganization). Each factor was heritable at age 11-13 years (h 2 = 42-53%) and 14-16 years old (h 2 = 38-57%). Additive genetic and unique environmental influences for these three dimensions of schizotypal personality acted in part through a single common latent factor, with additional genetic effects specific to both Interpersonal-Affective and Disorganization subscales at each occasion. The longitudinal correlation between the latent schizotypy factor was r = 0.58, and genetic influences explained most of the stability in this latent factor over time (81%). These longitudinal data demonstrate significant genetic variance in schizotypal traits, with moderate stability between early to middle adolescence. In addition to common influences between the two assessments, there were new genetic and non-shared environmental effects that played a role at the later assessment, indicating significant change in schizotypal traits and their etiologies throughout adolescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 41, no 4, p. 499-511
Keywords [en]
Genetics; Heritability; Longitudinal; Schizotypal personality; Schizotypy
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41066DOI: 10.1007/s10519-010-9401-xISI: 000292040700004PubMedID: 21369821Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79959730658OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41066DiVA, id: diva2:779527
Note

Funding Agencies:

NIMH R01  K02 MH01114-08

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research 2006-1501

Sweden-America Foundation

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-05-06Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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