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The genetic and environmental etiology of antisocial behavior from childhood to emerging adulthood
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, United States . (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Criminology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
Centre for Violence Prevention, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Criminology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2011 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 629-640Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research suggests that both genetic and environmental influences are important for antisocial behavior across the life span, even though the prevalence and incidence of antisocial behavior varies considerably across ages. However, little is known of how genetic and environmental effects influence the development of antisocial behavior. A total of 2,600 male and female twins from the population-based Swedish Twin Registry were included in the present study. Antisocial behavior was measured on four occasions, when twins were 8-9, 13-14, 16-17, and 19-20 years old. Longitudinal analyses of the data were conducted using structural equation modeling. The stability of antisocial behavior over time was explained by a common latent persistent antisocial behavior factor. A common genetic influence accounted for 67% of the total.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 41, no 5, p. 629-640
Keywords [en]
Adulthood; Antisocial behavior; Childhood; Longitudinal; Persistent; Twin
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41067DOI: 10.1007/s10519-011-9463-4ISI: 000294297200001PubMedID: 21431322Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80054864956OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41067DiVA, id: diva2:779528
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2004-1415
Note

Funding Agency:

Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research 2004-0383

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-05-06Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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