oru.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Genetic and environmental influences on nutrient intake
School of Nursing and School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, United States .
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, United States. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, United States.
2013 (English)In: Genes & Nutrition, ISSN 1555-8932, E-ISSN 1865-3499, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 241-252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between genetic and the environment represents a pathway to better understand individual variations in nutrition intake and food preferences. However, the present literature is weakened somewhat by methodological flaws (e.g., overreliance on self-report questionnaires), discrepancies in statistical approaches, and inconsistent findings. Little research on this topic to date has included examination of micronutrient intake. The purpose of this study is to improve the existing literature on genetic and environmental influences on energy and nutrient intake by addressing these gaps. Twin pairs (N = 358; age 11-13 years) provided 3-day food intake diaries, which were assessed for intake of total energy, macronutrients, and micronutrients. Structural equation modeling revealed that genetic influences accounted for a significant portion of the total variance in total energy (48 %), macronutrients (35-45 %), minerals (45 %), and vitamins (21 %). Consistent with previous studies, the shared environment appeared to contribute little to nutritional intake. Findings on vitamin and mineral intake are novel and are particularly beneficial for further research on the contribution of micronutrients to individual physical health status. Better understanding of the linkage between genes, environment, and nutritional intake and deficiencies can clarify behavioral and physical outcomes, potentially informing risk reduction, primary prevention, and intervention strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013. Vol. 8, no 2, p. 241-252
Keywords [en]
Diet; Environment; Genes; Heritability; Nutrient; Twin
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Research subject
Nutrition
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41071DOI: 10.1007/s12263-012-0320-8ISI: 000315164600009PubMedID: 23055091Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84876415663OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41071DiVA, id: diva2:779532
Note

Funding Agencies:

NIMH RO1 MH58354 K02 MH01114-08

NIH/NIEHS K01 ES015877-01 K02 ES019878-01

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records BETA

Tuvblad, Catherine

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tuvblad, Catherine
In the same journal
Genes & Nutrition
Nutrition and Dietetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 455 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf