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Psychopathic personality and negative parent-to-child affect: a longitudinal cross-lag twin study
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
2013 (English)In: Journal of criminal justice, ISSN 0047-2352, E-ISSN 1873-6203, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 331-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Previous studies that have explored the relationship between parenting style and children's antisocial behavior have generally found significant bidirectional effects, whereby parenting behaviors influence their child's antisocial outcomes, but a child's behaviors also lead to changes in parenting style.

Methods: The present study investigated the genetic and environmental underpinnings of the longitudinal relationship between negative parent-to-child affect and psychopathic personality in a sample of 1,562 twins. Using a biometrical cross-lag analysis, bidirectional effects were investigated across two waves of assessment when the twins were ages 9-10 and 14-15, utilizing both caregiver and youth self-reports.

Results: Results demonstrated that negative parental affect observed at ages 9-10 influenced the child's later psychopathic personality at ages 14-15, based on both caregiver and youth self-reports. For these 'parent-driven effects', both genetic and non-shared environmental factors were important in the development of later psychopathic personality during adolescence. There were additional 'child-driven effects' such that children's psychopathic personality at ages 9-10 influenced negative parent-to-child affect at ages 14-15, but only within caregiver reports.

Conclusions: Thus, children's genetically influenced psychopathic personality seemed to evoke later parental negativity at ages 14-15, highlighting the importance of investigating bidirectional effects in parent-child relationships to understand the development of these traits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 41, no 5, p. 331-341
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41076DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2013.07.001ISI: 000324608000009PubMedID: 24223446Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84883449448OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41076DiVA, id: diva2:779537
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-05-22Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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