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Aggression and rule-breaking: heritability and stability of antisocial behavior problems in childhood and adolescence
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Criminology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States; Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States; Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States .
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
2013 (English)In: Journal of criminal justice, ISSN 0047-2352, E-ISSN 1873-6203, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This twin study examined the structure of genetic and environmental influences on aggression and rule-breaking in order to examine change and stability across the span of childhood to mid-adolescence.

Methods: Behavioral assessments were conducted at two time points: age 9-10. years and 14-15. years. Using behavioral genetics biometric modeling, the longitudinal structure of influences was investigated.

Results: Aggression and rule-breaking were found to be influenced by a latent common factor of antisocial behavior (ASB) within each wave of data collection. The variance in the childhood-age common factor of ASB was influenced by 41% genetics, 40% shared environment and 19% nonshared environment. In adolescence, 41% of variance in the common factor were novel and entirely genetic, while the remainder of variance was stable across time. Additionally, both aggression and rule-breaking within each wave were found to have unique influences not common across subscales or across waves, highlighting specificity of genetic and environmental effects on different problem behaviors at both ages.

Conclusions: This research sheds light on the commonality of influences on different forms of antisocial behavior. Future research into interventions for antisocial behavior problems in youth could focus on adolescence-specific environmental influences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 41, no 5, p. 285-291
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41077DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2013.06.014ISI: 000324608000003PubMedID: 24347737Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84883457023OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41077DiVA, id: diva2:779538
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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