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The heritability of psychopathic personality in 14- to 15-year-old twins: a multirater, multimeasure approach
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
2014 (English)In: Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1040-3590, E-ISSN 1939-134X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 704-716Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Until now, no study has examined the genetic and environmental influences on psychopathic personality across different raters and method of assessment. Participants were part of a community sample of male and female twins born between 1990 and 1995. The Child Psychopathy Scale and the Antisocial Process Screening Device were administered to the twins and their parents when the twins were 14-15 years old. The Psychopathy Checklist: Youth Version (PCL:YV) was administered and scored by trained testers. Results showed that a 1-factor common pathway model was the best fit for the data. Genetic influences explained 69% of the variance in the latent psychopathic personality factor, while nonshared environmental influences explained 31%. Measurement-specific genetic effects accounted for between 9% and 35% of the total variance in each of the measures, except for PCL: YV, where all genetic influences were in common with the other measures. Measure-specific nonshared environmental influences were found for all measures, explaining between 17% and 56% of the variance. These findings provide further evidence of the heritability in psychopathic personality among adolescents, although these effects vary across the ways in which these traits are measured, in terms of both informant and instrument used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 26, no 3, p. 704-716
Keywords [en]
APSD; CPS; genetics; PCL:YV; psychopathic personality
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41080DOI: 10.1037/a0036711ISI: 000341491800002PubMedID: 24796343OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41080DiVA, id: diva2:779541
Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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CiteExportLink to record
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