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Human aggression across the lifespan: genetic propensities and environmental moderators
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
2011 (English)In: Aggression / [ed] Robert Huber, Danika L. Bannasch and Patricia Brennan, San Diego: Academic Press, 2011, p. 171-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter reviews the recent evidence of genetic and environmental influences on human aggression. Findings from a large selection of the twin and adoption studies that have investigated the genetic and environmental architecture of aggressive behavior are summarized. These studies together show that about half (50%) of the variance in aggressive behavior is explained by genetic influences in both males and females, with the remaining 50% of the variance being explained by environmental factors not shared by family members. Form of aggression (reactive, proactive, direct/physical, indirect/relational), method of assessment (laboratory observation, self-report, ratings by parents and teachers), and age of the subjects—all seem to be significant moderators of the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on aggressive behavior. Neither study design (twin vs. sibling adoption design) nor sex (male vs. female) seems to impact the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influences on aggression. There is also some evidence of gene-environment interaction (G × E) from both twin/adoption studies and molecular genetic studies. Various measures of family adversity and social disadvantage have been found to moderate genetic influences on aggressive behavior. Findings from these G × E studies suggest that not all individuals will be affected to the same degree by experiences and exposures, and that genetic predispositions may have different effects depending on the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Diego: Academic Press, 2011. p. 171-214
Series
Advances in Genetics, ISSN 0065-2660 ; 75
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Genetics
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41096DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-380858-5.00007-1ISI: 000303838500008PubMedID: 22078481Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-81055148339ISBN: 9780123808585 (print)ISBN: 9780123808592 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41096DiVA, id: diva2:779557
Note

Funding Agency:

NIMH NIH HHS  R01 MH058354

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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