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Impact of organic carbon on the leachability of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from shale residues
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7845-6495
Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. (Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre)
2015 (English)In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 75, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From 1942 to the 1966, oil was produced by pyrolysis of shale, in Kvarntorp, Sweden. This generated some 40 million m3 of metal rich pyrolyzed shale and discarded fines that were piled on site with its original metal content almost intact. The present study focuses on the leaching of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from fines after addition of wood chips and steel slag, in outdoor 1 m3 reactor systems at low liquid to solid ratio, in order to evaluate the potential environmental impact and recovery of the elements from the leachates. Seasonal variations were observed, with increased leaching during peak summer. For vanadium and molybdenum, high addition of wood chips decreased the leaching, probably due to adsorption. Manganese showed the opposite behavior while leaching of iron was almost independent of the amount of wood chips. Depending on the systems, up to 2200 μg L-1 vanadium, 90 μg L-1 molybdenum, 25 mg L-1 manganese and 500 mg L-1 iron was found in the aqueous phase. Applied to the 40 million m3 pile, the annual leaching of those elements may reach 14 ton, 0.6 ton, 200 ton and 2400 ton, respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 75, p. 100-109
Keywords [en]
Bioleaching; Environmental; Leaching; Pollution
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41168DOI: 10.1016/j.mineng.2014.10.018ISI: 000353861300015Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84927124587OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41168DiVA, id: diva2:779776
Note

Funding Agency:

Faculty of Economics, Science and Technology at Örebro University

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Utilization of waste materials for extraction of strategic metals: a biogeochemical approach
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Utilization of waste materials for extraction of strategic metals: a biogeochemical approach
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Worldwide the modern society produces vast amounts of waste materials containing strategic and valuable metals. Some of them are of substantial economic or environmental significance if controlled recovery of metals can be performed or if uncontrolled release to the environment occurs.

By cultivating Agrostis capillaris on historical sulfidic mine waste the leachate composition can be altered and its volume reduced. In combination with additives such as bark compost and water works granules the concentration of several hazardous metals decreased significantly already after eight weeks. Limited actions can therefore be used to decrease the environmental impact from such waste.

Shale in general contains considerable amounts of strategic metals. If naturally occurring microorganisms are provided with a source of nutrients, increased mobilization of strategic metals can be obtained. By using wood chips as the nutrient source the mobilization of vanadium and uranium increased significantly. Highest mobilization efficiency was observed when the carbon source was put on top of the shale.

Analysis of strategic metals is often performed by argon plasma techniques such as ICP-QMS. However, the use of argon increases the analytical costs. If isotopic information is not needed and slightly higher uncertainties can be accepted, several strategic metals can successfully be quantified by the nitrogen plasma based MP AES. The analytical cost can then be cut with more than 99%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Örebro: Örebro University, 2017. p. 79
Series
Örebro Studies in Environmental Science, ISSN 1650-6278 ; 17
Keywords
biogeochemistry, ICP-QMS, MP AES, strategic metals, vanadium, uranium, mine waste, steel slag, shale residues
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Enviromental Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-53960 (URN)978-91-7529-174-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-02-17, Örebro universitet, Hörsalen, Musikhögskolan, Fakultetsgatan 1, Örebro, 10:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-12-14 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved

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Sjöberg, ViktorKarlsson, Stefan

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