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Heritability for adolescent antisocial behaviordiffers with socioeconomic status: gene–environment interaction
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. (caps)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
The Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2006 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 734-743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Socioeconomic status is often assumed to be of importance for the development of antisocial behavior, yet it explains only a fraction of the variance. One explanation for this paradox could be that socioeconomic status moderates the influence of genetic and environmental effects on antisocial behavior.

Method: TCHAD is a Swedis h longitudinal population-based twin study that contains 1,480 twin pairs born 1985-1986. The present study included 1,133 twin pairs, aged 16-17 years. Antisocial behavior was measured through self-report. Family socioeconomic status was assessed by parentalreported education and occupational status. Neighborhood socioeconomic conditions were assessed using five aggregated level variables: ethnic diversity, basic educational level, unemployment level, buying power, and crime-rate. We used structural equation modeling to test whether socioeconomic status interacted with latent genetic and environmental effects for antisocial behavior.

Results: Gen etic influences on antisocial behavior were more important in adolescents in socioeconomically more advantaged environments, whereas the shared environment was higher in adolescents in socioeconomically less advantaged environments. Heritability for antisocial behavior was higher in girls than in boys, irrespective of socioeconomic background.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that differe nt intervention policies should be considered in different socioeconomic areas. In socioeconomically advantaged areas, it might be more fruitful to focus on individually based preventions and treatments. In socioeconomically disadvantaged areas, intervention and prevention policies might be more effective on a community level, to account for shared environmental risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 47, no 7, p. 734-743
Keywords [en]
Antisocial behavior; Gene-environment interaction; Sex differences; Socioeconomic status; Twin study
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-40860DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2005.01552.xISI: 000238186100010PubMedID: 16790008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33745040249OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-40860DiVA, id: diva2:782600
Available from: 2015-01-21 Created: 2015-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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