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A common genetic factor explains the association between psychopathic personality and antisocial behavior
Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King ’ s College London, UK.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. (caps)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King ’ s College London, UK.
Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8163-6558
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2007 (English)In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Both psychopathic personality traits and antisocial behavior are influenced by geneticas well as environmental factors. However, little is known about how genetic and environmental factors contribute to the associations between the psychopathic personality traits and antisocial behavior.

Method: Data were drawn from a longitudinal population-based twin sample including all 1480 twin pairs born in Sweden between May 1985 and December 1986. The twins responded to mailed self-report questionnaires at two occasions: 1999 (twins 13–14 years old), and 2002 (twins 16–17years old).

Results: A common genetic factor loaded substantially on both psychopathic personality traits and antisocial behavior, whereas a common shared environmental factor loaded exclusively on antisocial behavior.

Conclusions: The genetic overlap between psychopathic personality traits and antisocial behavior may reflect a genetic vulnerability to externalizing psychopathology. The finding of shared environmental influences only in antisocial behavior suggests an etiological distinction between psychopathic personality dimensions and antisocial behavior. Knowledge about temperamental correlates to antisocial behavior is important for identification of susceptibility genes, as well as for possible prevention through identification of at-risk children early in life

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 37, no 1, p. 15-26
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-40861DOI: 10.1017/S003329170600907ISI: 000244008400002PubMedID: 17049102Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33845973383OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-40861DiVA, id: diva2:782602
Available from: 2015-01-21 Created: 2015-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, CatherineAndershed, Henrik

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