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Resting heart rate and the development of antisocial behavior from age 9 to 14: genetic and environmental influences
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, 3620 South McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, United States .
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, 3620 South McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, United States . (caps)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
University of California, Riverside, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, 3620 South McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, United States .
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2009 (English)In: Development and psychopathology (Print), ISSN 0954-5794, E-ISSN 1469-2198, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 939-960Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The genetic and environmental basis of a well-replicated association between antisocial behavior (ASB) and resting heart rate was investigated in a longitudinal twin study, based on two measurements between the ages of 9 and 14 years. ASB was defined as a broad continuum of externalizing behavior problems, assessed at each occasion through a composite measure based on parent ratings of trait aggression, delinquent behaviors, and psychopathic traits in their children. Parent ratings of ASB significantly decreased across age from childhood to early adolescence, although latent growth models indicated significant variation and twin similarity in the growth patterns, which were explained almost entirely by genetic influences. Resting heart rate at age 9-10 years old was inversely related to levels of ASB but not change patterns of ASB across age or occasions. Biometrical analyses indicated significant genetic influences on heart rate during childhood, as well as ASB throughout development from age 9 to 14. Both level and slope variation were significantly influenced by genetic factors. Of importance, the low resting heart rate and ASB association was significantly and entirely explained by their genetic covariation, although the heritable component of heart rate explained only a small portion (1-4%) of the substantial genetic variance in ASB. Although the effect size is small, children with low resting heart rate appear to be genetically predisposed toward externalizing behavior problems as early as age 9 years old.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 21, no 3, p. 939-960
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41061DOI: 10.1017/S0954579409000509ISI: 000268021400013PubMedID: 19583891Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-70350443143OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41061DiVA, id: diva2:782616
Available from: 2015-01-21 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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