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Motor Impulsivity During Childhood and Adolescence: A Longitudinal Biometric Analysis of the Go/No-Go Task in 9- to 18-Year-Old Twins
University of Southern California, Seaside, California, USA; Department of Defense Center, Seaside, California, USA.
University of Southern California, Dept Psychol, Los Angeles, USA. (caps)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
University of Southern California, Dept Psychol, Los Angeles, USA.
Dept Criminol, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; Dept Psychiat, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; Dept Psychol, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
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2014 (English)In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 2549-2557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present study, we investigated genetic and environmental effects on motor impulsivity fromchildhood to late adolescence using a longitudinal sample of twins from ages 9 to 18 years. Motorimpulsivity was assessed using errors of commission (no-go errors) in a visual go/no-go task at 4 timepoints: ages 9–10, 11–13, 14–15, and 16–18 years. Significant genetic and nonshared environmentaleffects on motor impulsivity were found at each of the 4 waves of assessment with genetic factorsexplaining 22%–41% of the variance within each of the 4 waves. Phenotypically, children’s averageperformance improved across age (i.e., fewer no-go errors during later assessments). Multivariatebiometric analyses revealed that common genetic factors influenced 12%–40% of the variance in motorimpulsivity across development, whereas nonshared environmental factors common to all time pointscontributed to 2%–52% of the variance. Nonshared environmental influences specific to each time pointalso significantly influenced motor impulsivity. Overall, results demonstrated that although geneticfactors were critical to motor impulsivity across development, both common and specific nonsharedenvironmental factors played a strong role in the development of motor impulsivity across age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 50, no 11, p. 2549-2557
Keywords [en]
motor impulsivity, go/no-go task, twins, genetic and environmental effects
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42319DOI: 10.1037/a0038037ISI: 000344354700012PubMedID: 25347305OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-42319DiVA, id: diva2:784870
Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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