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Drinking experience uncovers genetic influences on alcohol expectancies across adolescence
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanent Northern California, , USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA. (caps)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles CA, USA.
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2015 (English)In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 110, no 4, p. 610-618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To test whether drinking onset moderates genetic and environmental contributions to individual differences in theetiology of alcohol expectancies across adolescence.

Design: Longitudinal twin design.

Setting: Community samplefrom Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Participants: A total of 1292 male and female twins, aged 11–18 years, were assessed at 1(n =440), 2 (n =587) or 3 (n = 265) occasions as part of the risk factors for the Antisocial Behavior Twin Study.

Measurements: Social behavioral (SB) alcohol expectancies were measured using an abbreviated version of the Social Behavioral subscale from the Alcohol Expectancy Questionnaire for adolescents (AEQ-A). Drinking onset was defined as>1 full drink of alcohol.

Findings: Alcohol expectancies increased over age and the increase became more rapid following onset of drinking. The importance of genetic and environmental influences on SB scores varied with age and drinking status, such that variation prior to drinking onset was attributed solely to environmental influences, whereas all post-onset variation was attributed to genetic influences. Results did not differ significantly by sex.

Conclusion: Only environmental factors explain beliefs about the social and behavioral consequences of alcohol use prior to drinking onset, whereas genetic factors explain an increasing proportion of the variance in these beliefs after drinking onset.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 110, no 4, p. 610-618
Keywords [en]
Adolescence, alcohol expectancies, drinking motives, genetic, drinking onset, longitudinal, twin
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology; Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42321DOI: 10.1111/add.12845ISI: 000351211200009PubMedID: 25586461OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-42321DiVA, id: diva2:784872
Note

Funding Agency:

Society for Multivariate Experimental Psychology R01 MH58354 T32 HL007034-37F31 AA018611

Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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