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When the first-person perspective is my perspective: An introspective study of the experience of singing
Kungl. Musikhögskolan, Stockholm,Sweden. (Nationella Forskarskolan i Musikpedagogik)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2250-3939
2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The first-person perspective is most central within phenomenology (Husserl 1913/2004). Dan Zahavi highlights the importance and hence the significance of this perspective by introducing it at the very beginning of his presentation of phenomenology as such (Zahavi 2007). When Husserl, the originator of modern phenomenology, uses this first-person perspective throughout his phenomenological investigations it is his perspective (Husserl 1900/2000). Even though the usage of ones own perspective as the first-person perspective is so common within the writings of phenomenological philosophers (who also claims that they are constructing rigorous science) it is still not commonly used as a perspective in our field of research within music education.  

In the PhD thesis by Torill Vist, ‘musical experiences’ was studied from a first-person perspective (Vist 2009). Prior to the thesis she used herself in a called self-interview. Her own experiences from being the first-person formed the base for her interviews with her informants as first-persons. In Self interview – Relevance in Research? Vist presents many interesting experiences from being this first-person (Vist 2006). In her thesis she declares how the insights from that prior study affected the PhD-study in a most profound way (Vist 2009).

In this paper presentation I will present benefits and challenges of using my perspective as the first-person perspective within my PhD-study of ‘the experience of singing with others from the singer’s point of view’. The presentation will not focus on the questions of why I choose to put my self as the first-person, but rather how I have done this and my experiences connected to that. Nor is it a presentation of how to transform subjectivity into objectivity or, to use a phenomenological vocabulary, a transcendent knowledge valid for others. My presentation will focus upon the experience, difficulties and advantages, of being the first-person in ones own research, which opens up for questions regarding relevance and trustworthiness within research in music education.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keywords [en]
introspection, self-interview, first-person, phenomenology
National Category
Musicology Educational Sciences
Research subject
Musicology esp. Musical Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-42729OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-42729DiVA, id: diva2:789085
Conference
Nordic Network for Music Educational Research (NNMPF 2011), Copenhagen, Denmark, March 30 - April 1, 2011
Available from: 2013-02-06 Created: 2015-02-17 Last updated: 2018-05-07Bibliographically approved

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Leijonhufvud, Susanna

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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More styles
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  • Other locale
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