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Isolation and characterization of a small antiretroviral molecule affecting HIV-1 capsid morphology
Division of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska Institutet, F68 Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0902-508X
Department of Electrical Measurements, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Tripep AB, Huddinge, Sweden.
Department of Biochemistry, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
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2009 (English)In: Retrovirology, ISSN 1742-4690, E-ISSN 1742-4690, Vol. 6, p. 34-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Formation of an HIV-1 particle with a conical core structure is a prerequisite for the subsequent infectivity of the virus particle. We have previously described that glycineamide (G-NH2) when added to the culture medium of infected cells induces non-infectious HIV-1 particles with aberrant core structures.

RESULTS: Here we demonstrate that it is not G-NH2 itself but a metabolite thereof that displays antiviral activity. We show that conversion of G-NH2 to its antiviral metabolite is catalyzed by an enzyme present in bovine and porcine but surprisingly not in human serum. Structure determination by NMR suggested that the active G-NH2 metabolite was alpha-hydroxy-glycineamide (alpha-HGA). Chemically synthesized alpha-HGA inhibited HIV-1 replication to the same degree as G-NH2, unlike a number of other synthesized analogues of G-NH2 which had no effect on HIV-1 replication. Comparisons by capillary electrophoresis and HPLC of the metabolite with the chemically synthesized alpha-HGA further confirmed that the antiviral G-NH2-metabolite indeed was alpha-HGA.

CONCLUSION: alpha-HGA has an unusually simple structure and a novel mechanism of antiviral action. Thus, alpha-HGA could be a lead for new antiviral substances belonging to a new class of anti-HIV drugs, i.e. capsid assembly inhibitors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 6, p. 34-
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-41992DOI: 10.1186/1742-4690-6-34ISI: 000265396300002PubMedID: 19356241Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-65449131619OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-41992DiVA, id: diva2:792893
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2000-06X-09501-10BSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, HIV-2006-050
Note

Funding Agencies:

K. U. Leuven GOA-05/19

Tripep AB

Available from: 2015-03-05 Created: 2015-01-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Abdurahman, Samir

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