oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Heritability and longitudinal stability of schizotypal traits during adolescence and early adulthood
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry and Psychol- ogy, University of Pennsylvania, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
2009 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 1573-3297, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 39, no 6, 649-649 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The study attempted to clarify further the genetic and environmental etiology of schizotypal personality traits in a sample of MZ and DZ twins drawn from the general population. Though twins were assessed using the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire- Child version (SPQ-C), amongst a wealth of other cognitive, psychophysiological, and behavioral measures on four occasions (Wave 1: age 9–11; Wave 2: age 11–12; Wave 3: age 14–15; Wave 4: age 16–18) of an ongoing, longitudinal twin study of personality and aggressive behavior, the current study utilized data from waves 2 and 3.

For wave 2, univariate genetic analyses revealed that schizotypal traits are modestly heritable (additive genetic effects ranging from 35 to 49%). Multivariate genetic model fitting results indicated that additive genetic and unique environmental influences acted through a single common latent pathway for cognitive-perceptual, interpersonal-affective and disorganization symptom dimensions of schizotypal personality during early adolescent development. The covariation among the three schizotypy sub-factors could be accounted for by a common ‘schizotypy’ latent factor which was significantly heritable, with additive genetic factors explaining 60% of the latent factor variance. Biometric analyses of wave 3 data are currently in progress. In addition, a significant dearth exists in regards to the longitudinal stability of schizotypy during development. The current study will also estimate the stability of schizotypal traits over approximately 4 years, during a critical time in adolescent development, with the aim of addressing this shortage in the literature

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 39, no 6, 649-649 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43823DOI: 10.1007/s10519-009-9307-7ISI: 000272027300053OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43823DiVA: diva2:797579
Conference
39th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Mineapolis, MN, USA, June 17-20, 2009
Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tuvblad, Catherine
In the same journal
Behavior Genetics
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 243 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf