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Low heritability for antisocial behavior among adolescents residing in low socioeconomic environments
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. (CAPS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
The Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2004 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 662-662Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Socioeconomic status and contextual variables are often assumed to be of importance for the development of antisocial behavior (ASB), yet they explain only a fraction of the variance (M. Stouthamer-Loeber,et al.(2002).J. Consult. Clin. Psych.70:111–123; R. J. Sampson, et al.(1997).Science277: 918–924). An explanation to this paradox could be that socioeconomic status moderates the influences of genetic and environmental effects on ASB. The Twin study of CHild and Adolescent Development (TCHAD) is a Swedish longitudinal population-based study including 1,480 twin pairs born 1985–1986.

The present study included 1139 of the twin pairs, aged 16–17 years. ASB was measured through self-report. Neighborhood socioeconomic status was assessed using five variables on aggregated level: ethnicity, educational level, occupational status, buying power, and neighbourhood crime rate. Family socioeconomic status was assessed by parental reported educational and occupational status. We used structural equation modeling to test whether socioeconomic status interacts with latent genetic and environmental effects of ASB. We found an interaction for girls between genetic influences and ethnicity; among girls living in a neighborhood with a mixed ethnic population, there was little evidence of genetic effects on ASB, whereas heritability was pronounced in areas with a high degree of ethnic Swedes. For boys, there was an interaction in parental reported occupational status; i.e. low familial occupational status resulted in less influence of genetic effects on ASB. The results suggest that adolescents residing in low socioeconomic environments are less sensitive to genetic influences for ASB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 34, no 6, p. 662-662
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43842ISI: 000224808200124OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43842DiVA, id: diva2:797896
Conference
34th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Aix en Provence, France, June 27-30, 2004
Available from: 2015-03-25 Created: 2015-03-25 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Tuvblad, Catherine

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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