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The genetic and environmental etiology of internalizing and externalizing behavior in adolescent twins
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
2011 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, Vol. 41, no 6, 927-927 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Comorbidity between internalizing (anxious, depressive) and externalizing (aggressive, delinquent) behavior is a well-established and common clinical reality throughout the lifespan, but perhaps becomes more significance in adolescence, when individuals are awarded more freedom. However, the genetic and environmental etiology of this comorbidity has rarely been examined in a behavioral genetic setting, especially during the period of adolescence. Additionally, research suggests that while caregivers may be more reliable reporters of externalizing behavior in youth, youth themselves are more reliable reporters of internalizing symptoms, raising the question of how different raters affect data patterns. Using the parent report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) as well as the youth report version (Youth Self Report—YSR), this research uses a twin study design to examine the etiology of coexisting internalizing and externalizing symptoms in mid adolescence (age 14–16 years) using a common pathway model that examined all data concurrently. Female comorbidity was accounted for by genetic and shared environmental influences, and male comorbidity by shared environmental influences, exclusively. Genetic influences emerged for all but self-report male externalizing behavior. Every scale showed unique influences as well, some of which were correlated between same-rater scales (e.g. parent report internalizing and externalizing), suggesting that some of the influences on covariation are rater-specific. These results contribute to our understanding of the nature of comorbid psychological disorders during adolescence, and suggest the importance of shared environment to the development of both internalizing and externalizing behavior

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 41, no 6, 927-927 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43892DOI: 10.1007/s10519-011-9495-9ISI: 000295326600133OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43892DiVA: diva2:798696
Conference
41st Annual Meeting of the Behaviour-Genetics-Association, Newport, RI, USA, June 6-9, 2011
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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