oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The genetics of motor disinhibition: a longitudinal analysis of the Go/NoGo task in twins
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Show others and affiliations
2009 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 1573-3297, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 39, no 6, 692-692 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

To understand the etiology of antisocial behavior it is essential to investigate the origins of inhibition and impulsivity. While impulsive personality traits (such as those examined by the Barrett Impulsivity Scale) appear to increase over time, motor impulsivity (as measured by stop-signal tasks) appears to decrease. To investigate the origins of this change in motor impulsivity in more detail, we examined the genetic and environmental influences on performance in a visual Go/NoGo task for twins from the USC Twin Project. Errors of commission (NoGo errors) were used to measure motor impulsivity and were assessed longitudinally on up to three occasions at ages 9–10, ages 12–13, and ages 14–15 years old. In addition to classical biometric genetic models to investigate developmental changes in genetic (A), shared (C) and non-shared (E) environmental influences across age, we also employed latent growth curve modeling to investigate genetic and environmental influences on individual differences in change in impulsivity across age. Univariate model fitting results suggest a primarily A and E origin for NoGo task performance within each of the three occasions with estimates for the genetic contribution ranging from A=0.20–0.30. Over time, subjects task performance tended to improve (i.e., fewer errors of commission), phenotypically. Growth curve models suggest that this improvement over time is primarily due to unique environmental effects, which increased in importance with age. Genetic effects, in contrast, played a key roll in determining initial error levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the genetic influences on impulsive behavior take effect early in life, prior to the onset of adolescence, and that environmental influences play an increasingly important role during development. The significance of these findings is discussed, along with implications for further research

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 39, no 6, 692-692 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43904DOI: 10.1007/s10519-009-9307-7ISI: 000272027300177OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43904DiVA: diva2:798813
Conference
39th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Mineapolis, MN, USA, June 17-20, 2009
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tuvblad, Catherine
In the same journal
Behavior Genetics
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 263 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf