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The longitudinal heritability of impulsivity in a sample of child and adolescent twins
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
University of Pennsylvania, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
2009 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, Vol. 39, no 6, 672-672 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

We examined the genetics of impulsive traits in children and adolescents in the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) in a longitudinal twin study between the ages of 9- and 16-years old. Comparisons of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin correlations suggest a significant heritability to each of the three impulsivity subscales in the BIS, including non-planning, motor impulsivity, and inattention. While a single common factor model fit the data well on two different occasions, some scale specific genetic variance also exists, particularly for inattention and non-planning, suggesting the multifactorial nature of impulsivity. The genetic influence on the common factor of impulsivity was somewhat larger in early adolescence (h2=0.57) than in mid-adolescence (h2=0.42). The relationship of the BIS impulsivity scales to laboratory measures of impulsivity (i.e., errors of commission and reaction times in the NoGo task and risky decision making in the Iowa Gambling Task) will also be investigated, in an effort to understand further the multi-factorial nature of impulsivity and its etiology in children and adolescence. Results from this study can be used to better our understanding of a construct underlying several psychiatric disorders and categories of antisocial or risky behavior.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 39, no 6, 672-672 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43906DOI: 10.1007/s10519-009-9307-7ISI: 000272027300121OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43906DiVA: diva2:798848
Conference
39th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Mineapolis, MN, USA, June 17-20, 2009
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2015-04-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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