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Genetic and environmental contributions to the underlying factor structure of psychopathic personality traits from childhood to adolescence
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Departments of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
2009 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, Vol. 39, no 6, 674-674 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The current study investigated the genetic and environmental contributions to the underlying factor structure of psychopathic personality traits from mid-childhood to adolescence. The participants for the current study were part of the ongoing University of Southern California Twin Study, a longitudinal study that has followed different sets of twins since they were 9- to 10-years old to assess the various risk factors for antisocial behavior (see Baker et al., 2006 for a complete description). Psychopathic personality traits were assessed when the twins were between the ages of 9–10 (Wave 1), 11–13 (Wave 2), and 14–15 (Wave 3) using both a self report and caregiver report of the Child Psychopathy Scale (CPS; Lynam, 1997). To determine if the factor structure found in adults has a similar pattern in childhood, confirmatory factor analyses were run on theoretical two- and three-factor models and a two-factor model reported in an earlier analysis of caregiver reports of each child’s behavior for the first three waves of assessment. Results from both the caregiver report at Wave 1 and the child self-report at Wave 3 suggested the same two-factor structure representing a Deceitful/Manipulative facet and an Impulsive/Irresponsible facet of the psychopathic personality in children to be the best fit to the data. To understand the genetic and environmental contributions to the underlying factor structure across time, a multivariate biometric analysis approach was applied to the twin data to assess additive genetic (A), shared or common environmental (C), and non-shared environmental (E) effects at each wave of assessment for both the caregiver and self reports. Results of these analyses indicated that the genetic contribution increases over time for the Deceitful/Manipulative factor. Although both factors were highly heritable, the Deceitful Manipulative factor was also influenced by both common and unique environments. To support continued longitudinal analyses of the data, invariance of the common pathway model across each wave of assessment was examined. A longitudinal model of factorial invariance can account for measurement error by holding constant the same factor structure across time. To further disentangle the genetic and environmental influences of psychopathic personality traits from mid-childhood to adolescence, a biometric model was fit to the longitudinally invariant factor structure to evaluate these contributions to the part of the CPS that was commonly measured at each wave. This final analysis can be used to further develop the longitudinal dynamic trajectory of psychopathic personality traits as measured by the CPS

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 39, no 6, 674-674 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43964DOI: 10.1007/s10519-009-9307-7ISI: 000272027300125OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43964DiVA: diva2:799261
Conference
39th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Mineapolis, MN, USA, June 17-20, 2009
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2015-04-13Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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