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The stability of reactive and proactive aggression
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
2007 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 1573-3297, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 37, no 6, 801-801 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Earlier research has shown that the stability of aggressive behavior is mainly due to genetic influences. It has been argued that aggressive behavior can be divided into reactive (impulsive, affective, ‘‘hot-blooded’’) and proactive (planned, instrumental, ‘‘cold-blooded’’) aggression. The aim of this study was to examine stability of genetic and environmental influences on proactive and reactive aggression from childhood to early adolescence.

Methods: The sample was drawn fromthe on going longitudinal Twin Study of Risk Factors for Antisocial Behavior at the University of Southern California (USC). The present study included 1,241 twins, measured on two occasions: ages 9–10 years and 11–14 years. Aggressive behavior, rated by parents, was measured using the Reactive and Proactive aggression Questionnaire (Raine et al. 2006). A bivariate Cholesky decomposition was used to analyze the data.

Results: There was a relatively high stability in both reactive (r= 0.54) and proactive (r= 0.47) aggression between childhood to early adolescence. The association for reactive aggression between the two time points was due to genetic influences, explaining 43% of the correlation, shared environmental influences accounted for 16%, with the remaining 43% due to non-shared environmental influences. For proactive aggression, the stability in proactive aggression was for 82% due to genetic influences, with remaining 18% due to non-shared environmental influences.

Conclusions: The stability in reactive aggression was due to both genetic and environmental influences, whereas the stability in proactive aggression was largely due to genetic influences. These results suggest that proactive and reactive aggression differs in their genetic and environmental stability, and provide further evidence for some distinction between reactive and proactive forms of aggression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 37, no 6, 801-801 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43965DOI: 10.1007/s10519-007-9169-9ISI: 000250977100158OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43965DiVA: diva2:799269
Conference
37th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Amsterdam, Netherlands, June 3-8, 2007
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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