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Pubertal timing and antisocial behavior in early and late adolescence: a longitudinal twin study
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
The Centre for Violence Prevention, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Department of Criminology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2005 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 1573-3297, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 35, no 6, 823-823 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine stability and change in antisocial behavior (ASB) between early and late adolescence and evaluate its association with individual differences in pubertal timing. The Twin study of Child and Adolescent Development (TCHAD) is a Swedish prospective population-based study of 1,480 twin pairs born 1985–1986. The present study included 1,212 twin pairs. Pubertal timing at age 13–14 and ASB at ages 13–14 and 16–17 were measured through self–report. Trivariate Cholesky decomposition was used to analyze the data. For boys and girls, the correlations between pubertal timing in early adolescence and ASB in early and in late adolescence ranged from 0.09 to 0.17 and were to a large extent explained by genetic factors (80–97%). The associations between ASB in early and late adolescence (boys:r= 0.55; girls r= 0.53) were mainly due to genetic (boys: 41%; girls: 59%) and shared environmental factors (boys: 53%; girls: 27%). For boys, unique effects in ASB in late adolescence were due to shared (35%) and non-shared environmental factors (65%), whereas for girls genetic factors were the largest new contributor (56%), with the shared environment accounting for 11%. Early pubertal maturation is a genetic risk factor for ASB. Further, genetic and shared environmental effects were important for continuity in ASB. The genetic influence on continuity suggests that persistence of ASB may mediate genetic effects into adult psychopathology. For boys, only environmental effects contributed to change in ASB at age 16–17, suggesting that boys may be more vulnerable to psychosocial or environmental risk factors (e.g. family discord, delinquent peers). In contrast, for girls, new effects were to large extent explained by genetic factors, indicating that partly different genes are important for ASB in early versus late adolescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 35, no 6, 823-823 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43966DOI: 1007s/10519-005-7287-9ISI: 000233391600122OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43966DiVA: diva2:799278
Conference
35th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Hollywood, CA, USA, June 29-JUL 2, 2005
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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