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Multivariate genetic and environmental modeling among childhood externalizing disorders across different modality
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8768-6954
2008 (English)In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 1573-3297, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 38, no 6, 653-653 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research has shown the importance of genetic factors in understanding the etiology of co-morbidity among childhood externalizing disorders, but results have not been consistent across studies in terms of relative weight assigned to genetic, shared and non-shared environmental factors. Specifically, heritability estimates may vary across different measurements, different time points and different informants. This study aimed to use multivariate genetic and environmental modeling to find best fitting models for co-morbid externalizing disorders, including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD), and to investigate how results change among multiple outcomes across different modality. The sample included 605 twin pairs recruited from the Southern California Twin Registry. Three independent analyses were run to examine (1) how genetic and environmental influences differ across measurement instruments using Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-IV) and Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), (2) how genetic and environmental influences change developmentally from age 9 to age 12, and (3) how genetic and environmental influences vary across different informants using both caregiver’s and teacher’s CBCL responses. Four alternative multivariate models were tested in each analysis, including a one factor common pathway model, a two factor common pathway model, a hierarchical model, and a Cholesky decomposition model. Results showed that the Cholesky model fit best for the multimeasurement data and longitudinal data, while hierarchical model fit best for the multi-informant data. Co-morbidity common to caregiver and teacher informant reports, and co-morbidity unique to each informant were both influenced largely by genetic influences. Shared environmental contributions, however, were not significant in explaining either the shared co-morbidity or co-morbidity unique to each informant

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 38, no 6, 653-653 p.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-43978DOI: 10.1007/s10519-008-9228-xISI: 000260539000159OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-43978DiVA: diva2:799522
Conference
38th Annual Meeting of the Behavior-Genetics-Association, Louisville, KY, USA, June 28, 2008
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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