oru.sePublikationer
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Autism spectrum disorder and low vitamin D at birth: a sibling control study
Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gillberg Neuropsychiat Ctr, Gothenburg, SE, Sweden; Skaraborgs Hosp, Res & Dev Ctr, Skövde, Sweden .
Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3587-6075
Univ Stockholm, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden.
Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gillberg Neuropsychiat Ctr, Gothenburg, SE, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2015 (English)In: Molecular Autism, ISSN 2040-2392, ISSN 2040-2392, Vol. 6, 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Insufficient vitamin D activity has attracted increasing interest as a possible underlying risk factor in disorders of the central nervous system, including autism.

Methods: In this study, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) was analysed in 58 Sweden-born sibling pairs, in which one child had autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and the other did not. The study group consisted of two representative samples; 47 Gothenburg sibling pairs with mixed ethnicities and 11 Stockholm sibling pairs with Somali background. 25(OH) D levels were analysed in the stored dried blood spots taken in the neonatal period for metabolic screening.

Results: The collapsed group of children with ASD had significantly lower vitamin D levels (M = 24.0 nM, SD = 19.6) as compared with their siblings (M = 31.9 nM, SD = 27.7), according to a paired samples t-test (P = 0.013). The difference was-most likely-not only accounted for by a difference in season of birth between ASD and non-ASD siblings since the mean 25(OH)D levels differed with similar effect size between the sibling pairs born during winter and summer, respectively. All children with African/Middle East background, both the children with ASD and their non-ASD siblings, had vitamin D deficiency.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that low prenatal vitamin D may act as a risk factor for ASD, however, there is a need for replication with larger samples. Future research should study whether or not adequate supplementation of vitamin D to pregnant women might lower the risk for ASD in the offspring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 6, 3
Keyword [en]
Autism spectrum disorder, Vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, Neonatal, Dried blood spots
National Category
Neurology
Research subject
Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44116DOI: 10.1186/2040-2392-6-3ISI: 000350599000002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44116DiVA: diva2:801071
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 523-2011-3646
Note

Funding Agency:

'Föreningen Mjölkdroppen' in Stockholm

Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2017-03-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bejerot, SusanneHumble, Mats B.
By organisation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden
In the same journal
Molecular Autism
Neurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 255 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf