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Mental health problems and recidivism among detained male adolescents from various ethnic origins
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. (CAPS)
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Research and Development LSG-Rentray, Zutphen, Netherlands .
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2013 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 22, no 8, 481-490 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines differences in self-reported mental health problems between detained youths from Dutch, Moroccan, and Surinamese origin and the usefulness of mental health problems to predict violent and property recidivism in these juveniles. A sample of 296 detained boys aged between 12 and 18 years were assessed by means of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Official information regarding criminal history and recidivism was collected 3-6 years later. In general, Dutch youths and Surinamese youths reported more conduct problems than Moroccan youths, while Dutch youths also reported more hyperactivity than Surinamese youths. Mental health problems were not predictive of violent recidivism in any of the ethnic groups, while being related with property recidivism in Dutch and Surinamese youths. The current study showed that Moroccan youths present themselves on the SDQ as a less seriously disturbed group of youths than their Dutch and Surinamese counterparts. Our results also clearly showed that SDQ self-report scores are not predictive of future violent crimes in any of the three ethnic groups. Implications of the findings and limitations of the current study are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 22, no 8, 481-490 p.
Keyword [en]
Antisocial; Delinquent; Ethnicity; Psychopathology; Risk assessment
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44155DOI: 10.1007/s00787-013-0384-zISI: 000322721300003PubMedID: 23436174Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84881480786OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-44155DiVA: diva2:801179
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Colins, Olivier F
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CiteExportLink to record
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